IACC – The International Anti-Corruption Conference

The International Anti-Corruption Conference (IACC) is the world’s premier global forum for bringing together heads of state, civil society, the private sector and more to tackle the increasingly sophisticated challenges posed by corruption.
Established in 1983, the IACC takes place usually every two years in a different region of the world, and hosts from 800 to 2000 participants from over 135 countries worldwide.

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International Chamber of Commerce Rules on Combating Corruption

The ICC Rules on Combating Corruption constitute the cornerstone of ICC’s anti-corruption work, serving both as a tool for self-regulation by business and as a roadmap for governments in their efforts to fight extortion and bribery.
These ICC Rules are intended as a method of self-regulation by business against the background of applicable national law and key international legal instruments. Their voluntary acceptance by Enterprises will promote high standards of integrity in business transactions, whether between Enterprises and public bodies or between Enterprises themselves.
These Rules play an important role in assisting Enterprises to comply with their legal obligations and with the numerous anti-corruption initiatives at the international level. They also provide an appropriate basis for resisting attempts at extortion or solicitation of bribes.

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BIAC – Business at OECD Anti-Corruption Committee

The Business at OECD Anti-Corruption Committee supports OECD efforts to fight against bribery and corruption to ensure integrity and a global level playing field. The OECD Anti–Bribery Convention and the monitoring mechanisms put in place have positioned the OECD as a leading institution in the international fight against corruption. Working towards the effective implementation of the commitments under the Convention and seeking continued expansion of adherence – including major emerging economies – are key to creating a global level playing field. Click here to read the latest Activity Update.

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GRECO – Group of States against Corruption

The Group of States against Corruption (GRECO) was established in 1999 by the Council of Europe to monitor States’ compliance with the organisation’s anti-corruption standards.
GRECO’s objective is to improve the capacity of its members to fight corruption by monitoring their compliance with Council of Europe anti-corruption standards through a dynamic process of mutual evaluation and peer pressure. It helps to identify deficiencies in national anti-corruption policies, prompting the necessary legislative, institutional and practical reforms. GRECO also provides a platform for the sharing of best practice in the prevention and detection of corruption.

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UNDP Anti-Corruption Portal

The Global Portal on Anti-Corruption for Development is a one-stop-shop for information and knowledge specialized on anti-corruption for sustainable development. It aims to support the work of development and governance practitioners, anti-corruption bodies, researchers, civil society organisations, and the donor community by facilitating access to information, cutting-edge knowledge, and practical tools on anti-corruption at a global, regional, and national level.

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Maritime Anti-Corruption Network

The Maritime Anti-Corruption Network (MACN) is a global business network working towards the vision of a maritime industry free of corruption that enables fair trade to the benefit of society at large. Established in 2011 by a small group of committed maritime companies, MACN has grown to include over 130 companies globally, and has become one of the pre-eminent examples of collective action to tackle corruption.
MACN and its members work towards the elimination of all forms of maritime corruption by: raising awareness of the challenges faced; implementing the MACN Anti-Corruption Principles and co-developing and sharing best practices; collaborating with governments, non-governmental organizations, and civil society to identify and mitigate the root causes of corruption; and creating a culture of integrity within the maritime community.

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International Anti-Corruption Day

On 31 October 2003, the General Assembly adopted the United Nations Convention against Corruption and requested that the Secretary-General designate the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) as secretariat for the Convention’s Conference of States Parties (resolution 58/4).
The Assembly also designated 9 December as International Anti-Corruption Day, to raise awareness of corruption and of the role of the Convention in combating and preventing it. The Convention entered into force in December 2005.
Governments, the private sector, non-governmental organizations, the media and citizens around the world are joining forces to fight this crime. The United Nations Development Programme(UNDP) and the United Nations Office on Drugs and Crime (UNODC) are at the forefront of these efforts.

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OGP – Open Government Partnership

Upon joining OGP, governments work with civil society to co-create two-year action plans, with concrete steps – commitments – across a broad range of issues. This model ensures that civil society organizations or direct citizen engagement has a role in shaping and overseeing governments. Collectively, over 4,000 commitments have been made globally.
OGP’s Independent Reporting Mechanism monitors all action plans to ensure governments follow through on commitments. Civil society and government leaders use the evaluations to reflect on their own progress and determine if actions have made an impact.

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OCCRP – The Global Anti-Corruption Consortium

The Global Anti-Corruption Consortium was launched to accelerate the fight against corruption around the world by combining hard-hitting investigative journalism with the skillful engagement of civil society.
By developing sophisticated follow-the-money data tools and strategies, OCCRP helps journalists around the world uncover complex illicit financial schemes. Advocacy groups, in turn, are well-positioned to demand justice and more accountable governments. The Global Anti-Corruption Consortium turns headlines into action by arming civil society with the information and evidence needed to create meaningful change, whether by holding corrupt officials to account, calling for policy reforms, or generating grassroots campaigns.
While corrupt officials and criminal networks are increasingly organized and globally coordinated, journalists and civil society have often worked in silos. We believe that strategic alliances between those fighting corruption are essential if we are going to drive real change.
The Global Anti-Corruption Consortium brings together investigative reporting from OCCRP and advocacy efforts driven by Transparency International. Since 2016, it has exposed money-for-influence scandals, global money-laundering vehicles, and how corrupt officials have exploited natural resource wealth, and pushed for reforms to combat graft around the globe.

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OECD G20 Anti-Corruption Topic Site

The G20 is an international forum, made up of 19 countries and the European Union, representing the world’s major developed and emerging economies. Together, the G20 members represent 85 % of global GDP, 75% of international trade and two-thirds of the world’s population. Because of its size and strategic importance, the G20 has a crucial role in setting the path for the future of global economic growth.
The G20 started out in 1999 as a meeting of finance ministers and central bank governors. Following the global financial crisis in 2008, the urgent need for a meeting of the G20 at the Leaders’ level emerged. For the first time in November 2008 in Washington D.C., G20 Leaders convened and managed to coordinate fiscal, monetary and economic policies to put the global economy on a path to recovery. Since then, the G20 has organically evolved, transforming itself from a global firefighter into a unique international forum to address long-term structural challenges.

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